November 2006 Entries

Still a Domino developer?

Ed Brill follows up on recent Domino Developer unhappiness related discussions here. I like the tone of the post, however I think the wrong people are going to respond - namely, existing and frustrated Domino Developers. He asks the questions: My ultimate goal in asking is to help find ways to evolve Domino developer skills to continue to be relevant in the market, and to attract new developers. How can we get there? The market relevance thing is obviously something that existing developers have opinions on. Keeping up with current trends (and I'm sorry, webservices are hardly a 'new' concept)...

Bethells Beach

It may not be the most beautiful beach in the world, but Bethells can be incredibly spectacular.

Photos from U2

Taken in Auckland NZ on Saturday, all with a K750i:

.NET for Domino Developers

A while ago I started to write a series of articles/postings on .NET for Domino Developers. There are others out there who have done similar things, such as Jeff over at crossedconnections.org. Unfortunately, I got busy, although I managed to get a few articles sort of part way through, I never posted a lot. Well, I'd like to ressurect the idea, as I think that there are a lot of people out there who could benefit from materials in this space. So I ask the question: What sort of ASP.NET questions do Domino Developers out there actually have? What sort of...

The relevance of Domino in today's web (2.0 etc)

In this post, Ferdy gets some of his gripes about Domino off his chest. He starts off by answering a simple question, "Is Domino still the best platform for Web Development?": It is the worst web development platform I have ever witnessed, and I say that as a big promoter of Domino web development. It feels like web support is added as an afterthought, without proper architecture or vision. It may have cut it back in 1999, but it certainly doesn't right now. There is a reason why hardly any internet site runs on Domino. I do it, and many in...

.Net: String vs. StringBuilder

When handling strings in .NET, it's known that it's "usually more efficient" to use StringBuilder.Append than String + String. However, using StringBuilder sacrifices a (small) amount of code readability, and creating a new StringBuilder() requires a certain amount of processor time in itself. So when is that trade off in efficiency worth it, and when is it best to stick with using a simple String + String? .Net String vs. StringBuilder - concatenation performance discusses this in a fair amount of detail. The article is a couple of years old now (August 2004), but it's well written and contains code snippets...

My first bad train experience

Todays ride home was the second of my bad train experiences (the first was a couple of months back from Britomart, but it didn't really turn out to be that bad so I let it slip and decided not to write about it). The train was approaching New Lynn when I got a text from the screwed train notification service, informing me that all trains would be running 30 mins late due to a mechanical failure. Our train seemed to be still moving, so clearly it wasn't going to affect us, right? We sort of paused for 5 mins at...

Gmail for mobile phones

New from Gmail, is Gmail for mobile devices. If your device is supported, you can download a small Java application from gmail.com/app and use it to view as well as send email via your mobile phone. I've tested it a couple of times today, and it looks pretty slick - definately something I'll be using a lot in the future. There's a couple of other new features listed on that page. Moving the Reply button is handy and long overdue, and the "Embarassment-reducing new message notifications" is something which is obviously going to make someone out there very happy. Gmail...

Generate a web palette

Colorblender (or colourblender to the rest of us) is a web based tool which will generate a 6 colour matching palette when given a single colour to start with. Incredibly handy for people who are slightly colour blind, or also for those who are simply too lazy to bother. The next step would be for the tool to automatically pick a font that it thought matched your palette. Sounds like a handy tool, and apparently it won an honorable mention 2.0 in some recent Web 2.0 awards if anyone really cares 2.0.

The next station is..

On the one hand, I'm kind of impressed that Auckland trains use GPS. On the other hand, the GPS was initializing for the entire journey. Perhaps whoever designed that system needs to reconsider what sort of output should go to public facing interfaces VS a local console!

IBM announces Lotus Expeditor

Expeditor is the next in the line of products which have been renamed to remove the Workplace brand. The press release is a pretty standard IBM one, containing lots of buzzwords and productive sounding catchphrases. "An open alternative to Microsoft .NET client software, Lotus Expeditor provides the flexibility that comes from service oriented architecture (SOA) and open standards-based software, giving all users a universal client experience and allowing WebSphere Portal, Lotus Forms and Lotus Sametime users to extend their current applications world beyond the desktop," said Ken Bisconti, IBM Vice President of Workplace, Portal and Collaboration Products. I'm not too...